Asbestos Awareness Training

iata300From £375

Face-Fit Testing

Fit2Fit Tests

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Non Licenced Removal Training

iata300From £575+vat

Call us to see how we can help

Call 0845 259 1149

Quality Asbestos Training Courses in Cornwall


Reasons to use Fire Coral...
  • IATP Asbestos Awareness Training from £375+vat for 20 delegates
  • On-site face-fit testing from as little as £195+vat for up to 20 tests.
  • Asbestos Removal Training (Non-Licensed) from £575+vat
  • Immediate certification if you've paid up-front.
  • Face-fit testing of up to 40 people per day

Like to speak to someone? Call us on 0845 259 1149

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Asbestos Training in Cornwall

It is mandatory for any labourer working with the fabric of a building to take Asbestos Training in Cornwall (The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006). Building contractors, plumbers, electrical engineers and decorators are all affected by this legislation but it isn’t just workers who need to understand what is required of them. With such important legal insight into the legal ramifications of the regulations, we strongly recommend that all supervisors and mangers also take the course.

Cornwall Asbestos Courses - Non-Licensed Removal

The Cornwall Asbestos Training has been expertly designed to surpass HSE requirements so you can be confident that your company is in full compliance with its legal obligations.

The Cornwall Asbestos Courses can be fully tailored to meet the needs of any business. Our aim is to ensure our clients have the best resources in place to protect their workforce.

About Cornwall

Cornwall is a ceremonial county and unitary authority of England, United Kingdom, forming the tip of the south-western peninsula of Great Britain. It is bordered to the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar. Including the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall has a population of 534,300, and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The administrative centre and only city is Truro. The area now known as Cornwall was first inhabited in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods. It continued to be occupied by Neolithic and then Bronze Age peoples, and later (in the Iron Age) by Celts. There is little evidence that Roman rule was effective west of Exeter and few Roman remains have been found. Cornwall was a division of the Dumnonii tribe―whose tribal centre was in the modern county of Devon―known as the Cornovii, separated from Wales after the Battle of Deorham, often coming into conflict with the expanding English kingdom of Wessex before King Athelstan in AD 936 set the boundary between English and Cornish people at the Tamar. Historically tin mining was important in the Cornish economy, becoming significant during the Middle Ages and expanding greatly during the 19th century when rich copper mines were also in production. In the mid-nineteenth century, however, the tin and copper trades entered a period of decline. Subsequently china clay extraction became more important and metal mining had virtually ended by the 1990s.