Asbestos Awareness Training

iata300From £375

Face-Fit Testing

Fit2Fit Tests

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Non Licenced Removal Training

iata300From £575+vat

Call us to see how we can help

Call 0845 259 1149

Quality Asbestos Training Courses in Stoke


Reasons to use Fire Coral...
  • IATP Asbestos Awareness Training from £375+vat for 20 delegates
  • On-site face-fit testing from as little as £195+vat for up to 20 tests.
  • Asbestos Removal Training (Non-Licensed) from £575+vat
  • Immediate certification if you've paid up-front.
  • Face-fit testing of up to 40 people per day

Like to speak to someone? Call us on 0845 259 1149

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Asbestos Training in Stoke

In line with the Control of Asbestos Regulations (2006) it is mandatory for any person who disturbs the fabric of a building to undertake Asbestos Training in Stoke. This includes building contractors, plumbers, electrical engineers and decorators, to name just a few. It is strongly recommended that all supervisors and managers attend a course because important legal insight is given about implementing the regulations.

Stoke Asbestos Courses - Non-Licensed Removal

The Stoke Asbestos Training has been expertly designed to ensure that your company meets, and actually surpasses, its legal obligations according to HSE regulations.

We take pride in being able to tailor the Stoke Asbestos Courses to meet specific needs of any business. We work hard to ensure that you have the tools in place to keep your workforce protected.

About Stoke

Stoke means "hamlet", from the Anglo-Saxon. It formed part of the ancient Forest of Mondrum. Stoke is not mentioned by name in the Domesday survey; the name was first recorded in 1260. Barbridge is mentioned in John Leland's Itinerary from a visit of 1536. The civil parish was originally a township in the ancient parish of Acton in the Nantwich Hundred; it was served by St Mary's Church, Acton. The manor was given by Randal de Praers to his son, who assumed the name Stoke, and later passed to the Beeston and Aston families. By 1622, it was held by the Minshull family of Stoke Hall. The manor was held by the Wilbraham family from 1753 to 1781, and was then sold to the Craven family. During the Civil War, Stoke was occupied by royalist forces in December 1643, together with much of the surrounding area. In the 17th–19th centuries, the area appears to have had a substantial Quaker population; a graveyard at Stoke Grange Farm was given to the movement in 1657 and remained in use until the mid-19th century. During World War II, Stoke Manor provided accommodation for land girls.